Raising project awareness across the globe

Post by Chantal Knowles:

I recently attended the Pacific Arts Symposium at the Museum of Anthropology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. The symposium provided an amazing opportunity to hear from Pacific islanders, academics, curators and artists working in the field of Pacific arts. I was able to present a paper on the collections of Tahitian Titaua Darsie-Brander held in the National Museums Scotland (more about her to come in a future blog) and encourage colleagues and friends to begin contributing to, and visiting this project website.

Musqueam elder Larry Grant greets Eruara Nia representing the Pacific Arts Association and Pacific Island community at the opening of the symposium and exhibition Paradise Lost? Contemporary Works from the Pacific at the Museum of Anthropology, Vancouver.

Musqueam elder Larry Grant greets Eruara Nia representing the Pacific Arts Association and Pacific Island community at the opening of the symposium and exhibition Paradise Lost? Contemporary Works from the Pacific at the Museum of Anthropology, Vancouver.

The symposium attended by over one hundred delegates was the most international forum yet that we have used to bring this exciting project to the attention of a wider audience. But our first three months of the project have been far from laid back, with project partners delivering talks across the country.

Artists Rosanna Raymond and Katrina Talei Igglesden perform at the opening of the conference, 5 August 2013.

Artists Rosanna Raymond and Katrina Talei Igglesden perform at the opening of the conference, 5 August 2013.

Presentations elsewhere have included Neil Curtis and Chantal Knowles’s paper ‘Pacific collections in Scotland – a review’ presented at the Museum Ethnographers Group annual conference in Brighton in April this year (see http://www.museumethnographersgroup.org.uk/en/conference/331-2013-conference.html); Jilly Burns discussed the role of the project in knowledge transfer at a Museums Galleries Scotland event in April; and both Neil Curtis and Chantal Knowles presented individual papers on Fijian collections at the Fiji Art Project Symposium at the University of Cambridge in June.

Looking forward we have several presentations coming up in the near future. Eve Haddow will be highlighting the work done so far at the University Museums in Scotland conference at St Andrews in October and Chantal Knowles will be at the Museums Galleries Scotland conference this week.

The project is rapidly making progress with new information coming to light daily. If you or your organisation want to hear more about the project or its outcomes as they develop please do get in touch. We are keen to involve as many people as possible in order to make the most of this opportunity to get Pacific Collections in Scotland known to a wider audience and connected to the people who care most about their future.

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